5 Ways that Sellers Can Focus on the Positives

When you are looking to sell, always focus on the positive aspects of your business. Many business owners fail to properly make a case for the benefits of their businesses to prospective buyers.  Be sure to make it clear that your business has stability and ample financial health. Let’s take a closer look. 

1. Prepare in Advance 

Preparing paperwork in advance will help to make sure that everything is in proper order and you’re not scrambling at the last moment. When your records are organized and correct, your prospective buyer will be able to truly see the value of your business. Buyers will also like to know that you have robust accounting processes that they can rely on in the future. 

You should also make sure that inventory is in stock and that any necessary upkeep has been done. All of these updates are part of the big picture when it comes to presenting your business in the best light to buyers. 

2. Reveal Your Methods of Operations 

You’ll also want to demonstrate that you have a solid formula for a successful business. Buyers love to see items in place like procedures manuals, as they reveal the routine tasks necessary to run the business. Anything you can provide that will help the buyer understand how to successfully run your business will help them understand its advantages. 

3. Keep Things Consistent

During the sales process, you’ll want to be sure to maintain regular operations. If prospective buyers see any kind of dip in success, this could negatively impact your deal. Selling a business is an all-encompassing process, and it can be next to impossible to handle all the associated tasks while still putting all the necessary time and energy into your business. 

Additionally, you will want to absolutely make sure confidentiality is maintained. A breach of confidentiality, whether to employees or to competitors, can quickly sabotage your deal. There are countless instances where a deal fell through due to a breach in confidentiality. 

4. Get an Outside Perspective

What is the best possible light for your business? Since you’re involved in the day to day running of the business, it is hard to have an outside perspective. Plus having never sold a business before, it can be hard to know what buyers will respond positively to. That is a great reason to work with a business broker or M&A advisor. They have years of experience knowing what attracts and deters buyers. They will help you to emphasize your strengths and minimize your weaknesses. 

While emphasizing the positives, you will of course want to be sure to be transparent about issues affecting your business. Otherwise, the lack of knowledge can come back to haunt you. When it comes to negative factors, your business broker or M&A advisor will work to help buyers to understand how some of these can be turned into positives once they take over the business. Or they can assist you to fix some of those weaknesses before putting your business on the market. 

5. Price Your Business Correctly

It should come as no surprise that if the price you set on your business is too high, you will lose interest from prospective buyers. That is another advantage to working with business brokers or M&A advisors. They will assist you to assign a fair market value to your buyers. When the price is optimal, the strengths of your business will stand out more. While it’s essential not to undervalue your business, you also want to make sure that you don’t overvalue it either. The good news is that brokerage professionals have experience and expertise at listing the optimal price. 

Copyright: Business Brokerage Press, Inc.

Mix and Match Studio/BigStock.com

The post 5 Ways that Sellers Can Focus on the Positives appeared first on Deal Studio – Automate, accelerate and elevate your deal making.

The Top 3 Reasons Why Deals Fall Through

No one likes to think about the deals that didn’t succeed. However, the fact of the matter is that sometimes things go wrong during the process and a sale doesn’t successfully close. We have pinpointed the most common reasons why this happens into three main categories. By understanding the issues that can prevent a deal from finalizing, we are able to dramatically maximize the odds of success for clients. 

1. Issues with the Seller

If a seller lacks a strong reason for wanting to sell his or her business, that seller is often unable to be flexible on the terms of a deal. As a result, when complexities arise during the sales process, the seller doesn’t have the patience, commitment and/or stamina to work to overcome those issues. In many cases, a seller has presented an unrealistic price for the business and simply cannot be realistic about the true value the business will sell for on the market. Another common issue that arises with sellers is that they are not fully transparent with the potential buyer. For example, they might be neglecting to mention serious problems with the business, such as new competition on the horizon.

2. Issues with the Buyer

Just like circumstances surrounding the seller may interfere with the sale of a business, the same is true for buyers. In some cases, the buyer is just mildly interested in being a business owner. As a result, he or she doesn’t have the wherewithal to continue on and navigate the complexities that can arise during the stages leading up to a successful deal. There are other issues that often pop up with buyers as well. For example, they also may have unrealistic expectations regarding price. Some buyers are not willing to pay the fair market value for a given business. In other cases, once they find out the amount of work that will be required to make the business successful, they are unmotivated to continue.

3. Third Party Interference

In some instances, there is no issue regarding the buyer or seller. Instead, it is a third party that interferes. An example of this would be a landlord being unwilling to transfer a lease or grant a new one. Or unexpected issues with the federal or local government could cause problems. Another problem that involves a third party occurs when outside advisors, such as attorneys, overlook the fact that the goal is to put together a deal that will work. Instead, they get so caught up in protecting the best interests of their clients that they erect too many roadblocks for a deal to succeed. These types of problems are often completely unexpected by either the buyer or seller.

It is hard to argue with the fact that if a buyer isn’t really committed to selling, perhaps it is not the best choice for them in the long run. The good news is that if potential problems are handled at the appropriate stage of the deal, most business deals do come to a successful conclusion. Business brokers and M&A advisors are specialists when it comes to resolving and circumventing potential issues. 

Copyright: Business Brokerage Press, Inc.

Worawee/BigStock.com

The post The Top 3 Reasons Why Deals Fall Through appeared first on Deal Studio – Automate, accelerate and elevate your deal making.

The Four Essential Stages of a Closing

When it comes to reaching a successful closing, there are four important stages to keep in mind. In this article, we will take a look at the process and what sellers can expect. If you are planning to sell a business, it is also helpful to understand in depth what the stages are from a buyer’s perspective. 

The Letter of Intent (LOI)

The letter of intent is one of the responsibilities that your business broker or M&A advisor will take on to assist you. Your letter of intent should include the price, terms, time frame anticipated as well as other factors, such as the seller’s transition and training. Details such as what is included and what is not included in the deal should always be addressed in this agreement. 

Due Diligence 

The due diligence process is also an essential step. Your business broker or M&A advisor will guide you during due diligence. All important facts and documentation should be evaluated, ranging from tax returns and internal P&Ls to leases, bank statements, and customer/employee lists.  Buyers who do not invest enough time and energy into due diligence can often have serious regrets after the deal has closed. Be sure to take your time with this stage. 

There are other areas of due diligence that should not be overlooked including the very important NDA, financial statements, credit reports and other factors. If you want to have a smooth closing (which clearly you do!), you will want to wisely invest your time in due diligence.

Financing Approval 

Financing approval is considered your lender’s responsibility. However, if you need advice and insights, your business broker or M&A advisor should be able to assist you. You may want to look into local SBA lenders or seller financing. 

Agreement Drafting

The final agreement drafting period must be taken seriously. This is a step where your attorney will be of tremendous assistance. Your written agreement should cover a wide range of aspects including everything from payment terms to assets and liabilities. Both the buyer and seller should know exactly what the arrangement will be. 

When these four stages are followed properly, your deal should close in a timely and effective manner. If you have any concerns or uncertainties about these parts of a closing, be sure to always ask the necessary questions. 

Copyright: Business Brokerage Press, Inc.

Natee Meeplan/BigStock.com

The post The Four Essential Stages of a Closing appeared first on Deal Studio – Automate, accelerate and elevate your deal making.

Take Inventory of Your Company

Most business owners don’t give a second thought to the idea of going to the doctor for an annual physical. So why do they not give the same level of care and consideration to their company? The fact of the matter is that many executives literally go decades without giving their companies a “physical.” They only stop to truly evaluate their business when required by regulations or another matter forcing them to do so.

Consider an Annual Valuation 

Let’s take a look at some of the reasons why business owners should get an annual valuation. The first issue concerns the curveballs life often throws at us. At any given time, you and your business could be unexpectedly hit with everything from partnership issues or life changes like a divorce to changes in bank relationships. When you keep careful track of the value of your business, you will know in advance how potential changes would affect you. Perhaps even more importantly, you will gain an understanding of the health of your business.  

Monitor Business Growth 

It’s critical to be aware of how your business compares from one year to the next. Are values definitely increasing? If not, you would surely want to know immediately and start making necessary adjustments. If a major problem were to surface, you would want to know about it right away so that you can take action. Otherwise, you might just let the years pass you by while this issue goes unchecked. This is the kind of data you will gain when you commit to regular valuations. 

Be Prepared for the Unknown

You might feel far from ready to sell. However, you should always be ready if the situation does present itself. What if an amazing opportunity showed up on your doorstep? On the flip side of the coin, what if a life issue like illness put you in a situation where a sale was suddenly necessary? If you are not ready both mentally and with the necessary paperwork for your business prepared, you might miss out on a legitimate opportunity. 

Statistics gathered from a prominent accounting firm showed that 65% of business owners do not know what their company is worth. However, at the same time 75% of the net worth of these business owners is tied up in their business. The problem with these statistics is quickly evident. Be sure to take as good of care of your business as you would take of yourself. 

Copyright: Business Brokerage Press, Inc.

SeventyFour/BigStock.com

The post Take Inventory of Your Company appeared first on Deal Studio – Automate, accelerate and elevate your deal making.

Defending Your Asking Price

When you’re putting your business on the market, one of the top considerations is your asking price. Once you have a fair price established, let’s take a closer look at how business brokers and M&A advisors work with their clients to back up that price with details concerning why it is justified. 

Telling the Story

A key aspect of defending your asking price is telling the story of your business. Your brokerage professional will help you go over the details of the story so it is properly conveyed to prospective buyers. Buyers, of course, will want to understand the story behind the business so that they can understand its history and why it is for sale. You will want to feel prepared to interact with prospective buyers and how to discuss details concerning its value. 

Your business broker or M&A advisor will put together written materials about your business. These also help buyers gain clarity on the story of your business and its sales message. 

Seeing Your Buyer’s Perspective

It goes without saying that a big part of coming up with your decision of the asking price is that you want something that sounds not only reasonable but also attractive to buyers. We recommend trying to view the entire transaction from the buyer’s perspective. The buyer must be able to see how they will successfully own and potentially operate the business, as this is essential for fostering a completed deal.

Another consideration is, how will they pay for the business? In many cases, it can tremendously benefit a transaction to offer assistance in the way of seller financing. Seller financing can speed up the process, as you will not be so reliant waiting for the bank loan process, which can drag out for months. 

The Complexities of Your Asking Price 

The process of establishing and then justifying your asking price is not always simple. It is a symphony of moving parts, and it’s important to feel educated and involved in the process. Ultimately justifying the asking price is the launching point of the process, but it is also just the beginning of the journey towards the completion of a successful deal.

Copyright: Business Brokerage Press, Inc.

Natee Meepian/BigStock.com

The post Defending Your Asking Price appeared first on Deal Studio – Automate, accelerate and elevate your deal making.

Common Legal Mistakes That Sellers Make

Nothing strikes fear in the heart of a business owner like a legal mistake. The best way to ensure that you will avoid serious legal issues is to work with a trusted and experienced team. Otherwise, it’s easy to accidentally miss necessary steps. 

When you’re selling a business, there are a lot of moving pieces, and that means that there are ample opportunities for things to go wrong. It’s always best to be prepared. When mistakes are made, it can not only mean a significant expenditure of your time, but also your money. These kinds of issues can also bring your sales process to a total halt and perhaps derail your deal completely.

There are more than a few sellers who overlooked the importance of working with an attorney. When you are selling a business, it should come as no surprise that there is a great deal of paperwork. Your attorney will guide you to make sure that all necessary preparations have been made from a legal perspective. When your prospective buyer sees that your legal “ducks are in a row,” he or she will feel more confident in your organization and level of professionalism.

One document that often is skipped is the Letter of Intent (LOI). Sellers assume that things will move along more quickly if they forego this document. Keep in mind that the LOI truly has its place in almost any deal. After all, it not only outlines both parties’ expectations in writing, it also works to protect your best interests. Once projective buyers have signed this document, it proves they are serious about the deal. That means it is not so easy for them to walk away without consequences. 

What if your deal falls through completely? Will your buyer then reveal to the public that your business was for sale and even the potential terms that were on the table? This could indeed occur if you were not backed up by an NDA. Don’t skip this very important document either. Your business broker or M&A advisor will be very well acquainted with NDAs and guide you in the best way possible. 

Warding off these kinds of issues is one great reason to be equipped with a small team of professionals to turn to for advice. This team should include your business broker or M&A advisor, accountant, and attorney. 

Copyright: Business Brokerage Press, Inc.

Peerawich Phairsitsawan/BigStock.com

The post Common Legal Mistakes That Sellers Make appeared first on Deal Studio – Automate, accelerate and elevate your deal making.

What Does the Road Ahead Look Like?

Each quarter, the Market Pulse Report issues a report revealing information about market conditions The report is supported by M&A Source and the International Business Brokers Association. The data that is analyzed is based on a comprehensive survey of business brokers and M&A advisors. The report focuses on Main Street businesses (with values up to $2MM) and the lower middle market (values between $2MM and $50MM.) 

The research is conducted and then the report is published each quarter to reflect the state of the industry. In this article, we will look at some of the key takeaways of the report and what it reveals about the path ahead for buyers and sellers.

Tracking the Labor Shortage 

For the second quarter, the report revealed a variety of interesting information. One massive data point from the report is that the labor shortage continues to be a significant variable for business owners. A staggering 92% of report respondents state that the labor shortage has negatively impacted their business with 54% stating that the shortage has had a “very negative impact” and 35% stating that the impact is “somewhat negative.”

Closing Times

The report further indicated that it is taking about seven months for a business to close. They noted that it takes about six months to a year to sell a well-priced business or a well benchmarked business. The report noted that approximately 60-120 days are spent in the due diligence or execution stage, once the letter of intent has been signed. 

The Strongest Industries

In terms of what kinds of businesses are selling, the report points to restaurants making a solid comeback. It is interesting to note that restaurants valued from less than $500K to $1 million are enjoying a particularly strong rebound. Business services, personal services, construction and manufacturing remain steady. 

In Summary 

The latest Market Pulse Report is pointing in several directions. Currently, three factors are impacting business owners, namely, the labor shortage, inflation, and supply chain issues. Many businesses have had no choice but to give large raises to employees, and others have been able to pass the costs on to consumers and buyers.

Copyright: Business Brokerage Press, Inc.

Natee Meeplan/BigStock.com

The post What Does the Road Ahead Look Like? appeared first on Deal Studio – Automate, accelerate and elevate your deal making.

Storytelling and Its Role in Selling a Business

When it comes to selling a business, there is more to it than just relaying the facts. It’s also important to emphasize the story behind the business. Business brokers and M&A advisors are also storytellers, as they must convey to buyers the story behind the business and how it can ultimately be transformed. 

It is through storytelling that humans organize the information they have about the world. In short, storytelling is an exceptional way to learn lessons in life and a great way to frame information about a business to sellers. 

Telling Your Story

Everything begins with the financials, in short, the facts of the business. When a business broker or M&A advisor begins working with a seller, he or she will look to gather those details. Once that information has been gathered, it is possible to begin to create a story. That story can be presented in many ways, including through a confidential business review or confidential information memorandum.

While many, if not most, buyers and sellers may think that when it comes to business, they are cold and methodical like a reptile on the hunt, the truth is more complex. Human emotion always comes into play. It is no accident that well-crafted stories, with their power to motivate and guide, play a role in the art of buying and selling businesses.

Decisions are Guided by Emotion

If we want to make the best decisions, it is important to consider the role of emotions in our decision-making. “In order to have anything like a complete theory of human rationality, we have to understand what role emotion plays in it,” said scientist Herbert Simon who is an American Nobel Laureate. [1]

Good stories grab the imagination and enable people to expand their definition of what is and is not possible. When buyers are considering buying a business, it is important that they can picture themselves as being the hero that transforms that business and takes it to a new level. It is a story of evolution and reaching new heights while simultaneously achieving one’s own goals.

It is no accident that so many of today’s mass culture storytelling revolves around sequels. The notion that there is a “storytelling continuum” where a buyer can plug into something that already has a history can be a powerful motivating force. Most epic stories have the hero as part of some sort of continuum. In other words, the hero does not simply appear out of nothingness. It is the hero’s mission to transform the world, in some fashion, for the better.

[1] https://www.forbes.com/sites/forbescoachescouncil/2018/05/09/how-your-emotions-influence-your-decisions/?sh=7bda49da3fda

Copyright: Business Brokerage Press, Inc.

joaoserafim/BigStock.com

The post Storytelling and Its Role in Selling a Business appeared first on Deal Studio – Automate, accelerate and elevate your deal making.

How to Transfer Your Business to a Family Member

Are you thinking of transferring your business to a family member? This occurrence is fairly common, especially among small businesses. Here are some considerations that will help with your planning and decision making.

Do You Have a Good Contract?

Sometimes close family members are tempted to skip a contract, but it’s always a mistake not to have things in writing. When you create a buy-sell agreement, it helps keep things clear between the parties involved. Make sure that your documentation is thorough. It should cover a wide variety of details including the amount being paid, your continued involvement, and the business value. 

Does Your Family Member Need Financing?

When it comes to selling businesses to family members, seller financing is common. You could even consider agreeing to a private annuity. This will allow payments to be spread out over many years.  One benefit to providing financing assistance is that you will receive a steady stream of income along with interest on the loan as well. 

You could also consider a self-cancelling clause on your installment note. This would allow debt to attach to your will in case of your untimely passing before the payments were complete. 

Are You Selling or Gifting Your Business?

Gifting a business takes place more often than you might think, due to the tax benefits involved. Also, when you gift a business, you can still maintain some level of control. 

The federal gift tax exemption changes every year. In 2022, the annual gift tax exclusion is $16,000. The lifetime gift exemption limit is $12 million. While you may owe some federal gift taxes if the amounts exceed the exemption limits, the good news is that after you have transferred your business, any future growth of the business won’t affect your financials. 

Is Everything Accurate?

Unfortunately, many business owners have acted unethically when it comes to transferring their business to their family members. As a result, the IRS tends to give this kind of transaction extra scrutiny. You will want to ensure that all your paperwork is in proper order and highly accurate. 

You may very well want to hire the services of a lawyer and accountant to assist you with this matter. Of course, a business broker or M&A advisor will also help you with the details of this agreement and figuring out what benefits you and your family members.

Copyright: Business Brokerage Press, Inc.

nd3000/BigStock.com

The post How to Transfer Your Business to a Family Member appeared first on Deal Studio – Automate, accelerate and elevate your deal making.

Why Is Confidentiality So Vitally Important

When it’s time to sell a business, you will want to keep confidentiality first and foremost in your mind. The reality is that many deals do not succeed when confidentiality is breached and others learn that your business is for sale. Let’s take a look at why this is the case.

What Can Occur When Confidentiality is Compromised?

If vendors or suppliers find out that your company is for sale, it can negatively impact your business in different ways. One common occurrence is that vendors begin to change the terms they have established with you. Even a small change might end up not being minor at all, as it could impact cash flow. The same can be said for word of your business being for sale reaching your creditors, as they could also suddenly change their terms. 

Another major issue that could be caused when confidentiality is breached is that your employees and customers might begin to worry. Employees could even start looking for new jobs. Your customers might worry about the new ownership and preemptively stop patronizing your business.

It goes without saying that you won’t want your competitors knowing that you are selling your business. This might make them more aggressive, and they could even start using this knowledge to take your customers. 

On some occasions, business owners set out to sell their business on their own. Unfortunately, this decision can put them at higher risk for confidentiality breaches to occur, which start to cause things to go wrong. When you are in the process of selling your business, you will want everything to appear as steady and reliable as possible.

Keeping Up Appearances

When a buyer is carefully vetting your business for a potential acquisition, you won’t want anything showing up on the radar that could give them pause. It’s important to show that the business is continuing to operate in a successful manner and there have been no recent changes. 

The good news is that business brokers and M&A advisors have proven strategies that will keep the news that your business is for sale confidential. Your brokerage professional will be sure to vet all prospective buyers, and they will use the most reliable confidentiality agreements that will protect your best interests. 

Copyright: Business Brokerage Press, Inc.

World Image/BigStock.com

The post Why Is Confidentiality So Vitally Important appeared first on Deal Studio – Automate, accelerate and elevate your deal making.

Selling a Business Means You Should Expect the Unexpected

No one ever said selling a business was predictable. However, the truth of the matter is that every sale is different. Even the reasons behind a business owner deciding to sell his or her business vary tremendously. If you are getting ready to sell, it’s important to be aware of the various aspects that could catch you off-guard. If you are prepared for the unexpected, you’ll be mentally ready for the sales process, which often does not go as planned. Even the smoothest and most streamlined sales encounter a few road bumps along the way. 

Price Considerations

When it comes to the price structure for a potential sale, many business owners have numbers in their minds that do not meet with reality. As a result, a potential offer could be far less than what they expected, and this causes conflict and delays. Your brokerage professional will prepare you with a thorough valuation so you can have a clear idea of the fair market price of your business. Be sure to ask any questions that you might have so that you feel fully informed when it comes to prices.

Confidentiality 

Throughout the sales process, confidentiality must be carefully guarded. Otherwise, this too can interfere with a sale. Your business broker or M&A advisor will have effective strategies to help maintain the highest levels of confidentiality. Even with the best safeguards in place, there is a small chance that a rumor could begin to circulate and word could get out to your employees, customers or supplies. In the case of this incident, it’s important to have a contingency plan in place to quell the rumors. 

Your Stockholders

Oftentimes, business owners of privately owned companies forget that their minority stockholders have rights too. You will not be able to sell your business without dealing with all parties involved. When you get a “fairness opinion,” it can go a long way to convince your shareholders of the best price and terms. Even if your shareholders are members of your family, they will have to be successfully dealt with before the sale goes through. 

Expect to Allocate Time

You may have hired an experienced business broker or M&A advisor, but you should still be prepared to spend some time dealing with the sale of your business. You’ll be expected to do everything from prepare documents to meet with prospective buyers. This fact that selling will take up your time is particularly true if you haven’t begun making preparations years in advance. That’s why we advise clients to start working with us early on.

You’ll want to make sure that despite your need to focus on elements pertaining to the sale of your business, it is necessary to keep your business running smoothly. Otherwise, any signs of weakness could interfere with your potential sale and your efforts could backfire. This issue just stresses the importance of preparing to sell years in advance. 

Through the sales process you must still run your company as well as ever. You’ll want to make sure things are progressing nicely, even if you don’t plan to own the company in the near future. Obviously, your buyer will want things to look reliable and any dips can trigger a red flag. 

Copyright: Business Brokerage Press, Inc.

theLivePhotos/BigStock.com

The post Selling a Business Means You Should Expect the Unexpected appeared first on Deal Studio – Automate, accelerate and elevate your deal making.

Preparing for Your Eventual Retirement

Many business owners are truly committed to their businesses. As a result, it is very difficult for them to step away even when they approach retirement age. It is not uncommon for business owners to keep working into their golden years. But the truth of the matter is that at some point almost everyone will need to embrace retirement whether it is for health issues, moving to a new location, or simply for greater peace of mind.

If you see this path approaching for you in the near future, it could feel overwhelming. After all, most people have not sold a business before. As a result, they feel unclear about the process and don’t know where to start. However, everyone should be thinking about the eventual sale of their business because this future event should determine many of your current activities and decisions. 

Let’s take a look at some things you can do well in advance to ensure that an eventual sale of your business goes as smoothly as possible. 

Automate Processes

When prospective buyers look at your business, they will want to be able to easily envision it operating smoothly without you involved. Because a good portion of business owners are so integral to the functioning of their businesses, it can be difficult for them to figure out how to decouple themselves from operations. In some cases, this process can take years. 

Now is a good time to consider this issue and what you can do to make sure your business can function without you one day. Give some thought to who at your organization could be a second in command. When a buyer sees that a competent and knowledgeable employee will be staying on to assist them, it can go a long way in allaying any concerns. 

Put Yourself in the Buyer’s Shoes

Imagine you were buying your business. What kinds of issues might be of concern to you? Chances are these will be the same issues that could concern potential buyers. Once you have identified any spots of weakness, you can start to zero in on figuring out how to handle them.

First and foremost, you will want your buyer to feel confident that there will be a smooth transition and that they can almost immediately begin to profit from their purchase of your business. Anything that you can do to help ensure that is true will benefit the sales process. 

Business brokers and M&A advisors are experts in the world of buying and selling businesses. They will help you to properly evaluate your business and look for these areas of weakness. Through this means when you do decide it is time to retire, the process will go more quickly and seamlessly. 

Copyright: Business Brokerage Press, Inc.

pikselstock/BigStock.com

The post Preparing for Your Eventual Retirement appeared first on Deal Studio – Automate, accelerate and elevate your deal making.

A Look at the Market Pulse Report

The Market Pulse Report Survey is a resource that has a variety of information that business brokers and M&A advisors regularly utilize to better understand the business landscape. The most recent survey was conducted April 1st to April 15th 2022 and had 360 broker and advisor respondents. It also marked the 40th edition of the quarterly report. The Executive Summary of the report can be accessed here https://www.ibba.org/resource-center/industry-research/ 

The Main Street Market 

One notable fact included in the latest report is that in the Main Street market, between 70% to 80% of buyers are likely to come from within a 20-mile radius. However, with larger companies, it is common for buyers to originate from a distance of over 100 miles away or greater.

The survey also indicated there are two key “headwinds” that businesses are currently facing. These include labor shortages and supply chain issues. Not surprisingly, labor issues are currently creating problems for organic growth. Likewise, supply chain issues can cause prospective buyers to shy away from a business.

The Profile of Current Buyers

The survey also indicated that Main Street buyers not only include the “typical” first-time business buyer. These individuals are often looking for a job in the form of owning a business. Serial entrepreneurs who have made money off previous deals are also now seeking to jump back in and buy another business. The survey indicates that about one-third of buyers who purchased businesses in the $500K to $1M range are serial entrepreneurs. 

Additionally, there is a great deal of money flooding into the industry. The money is mostly coming from private equity, family offices, and corporations. Feeling burned by the lack of bank credit by the 2008-2009 economic downturn, these buyers don’t want to get caught in a similar situation again. 

A Seller’s Market

The survey indicates that it is currently a seller’s market and that record setting multiples have been occurring. In Q1, an impressive 97% of businesses were receiving their asking price. However, nothing lasts forever. If you’re considering selling your business, it’s a good idea to start making progress now before this trend stops benefitting sellers. 

Even with the strong sales track record last quarter, it’s important to note that a fast sale is still improbable. Even in the best economic conditions, it typically takes many months to sell a business. 

There are many factors currently benefiting sellers, such as low interest rates, SBA involvement, and people not wanting to work for corporations. However, it’s important not to wait for the “right moment” as often that moment never comes. 

It’s always a good idea to begin taking steps to prepare for the sale of your business as soon as possible. This can make a tremendous difference toward fostering a positive final outcome.

Copyright: Business Brokerage Press, Inc.

annlisa/BigStock.com

The post A Look at the Market Pulse Report appeared first on Deal Studio – Automate, accelerate and elevate your deal making.

3 Ways to Make Your Business Appealing to Buyers

If you are like most business owners, you have never sold a business before and might not have a clear idea of what the process is like. We recommend preparing your business in a way that makes the sale and transition process as easy for your buyer as possible. It should come as no surprise that buyers will like the idea of an easy transition. 

It will be very beneficial if you take the time in advance to evaluate the steps and think about what you can do on your end to benefit your buyer. Since you’re the expert on your business, you have unique insights into what would make the transition the most seamless for the other party. When you prepare for the sale with your buyer’s experience in mind, you will likely not only speed up the sales process, but also increase the selling price. 

1. Automate Processes

Just like you may have never sold a business before, your buyer may have never bought a business before. If you can figure out how to automate as many processes as you can, it will help with their workflow and reduce the level of intimidation your buyer may be feeling about taking over. 

2. Establish a Second in Command

One thing you can do is have a second in command on your staff. If there is a competent employee that your buyer can depend upon for assistance and support, that fact alone will be tremendously attractive. If you do not yet have that person in place, you might have an eye on choosing a person and preparing them for this role. Speaking of staff, you will want to make sure your entire staff is well-trained and any HR issues are resolved in advance. 

3. Keep Things Consistent 

As you get closer to the time you will put your business up for sale, you will want to begin to work with vendors and key customers. You will want to ensure that the supply chain and significant customers are consistent. Otherwise, this could cause major disruptions for your buyer and impede his or her success.  Of course, it goes without saying that you’ll want to keep the potential sale of your business completely confidential. If customers, vendors, and even employees learn about an upcoming sale, this fact alone can lead to a chain reaction of disruptions and problems. 

A business broker or M&A advisor can help in a wide variety of ways when you are getting ready to sell. They are experts in maintaining confidentiality while taking you through the sales process from start to finish. Brokerage professionals will also assess your business and inform you of any areas that could be improved to make your business more attractive to buyers. 

Copyright: Business Brokerage Press, Inc.

SerGrey/BigStock.com

The post 3 Ways to Make Your Business Appealing to Buyers appeared first on Deal Studio – Automate, accelerate and elevate your deal making.

4 Takeaways from the Latest BizBuySell Quarterly Report

BizBuySell is an online resource that focuses on offering unique content that specifically addresses the needs of buyers and sellers. To make this happen, BizBuySell has teamed with a range of experienced business brokers who are covering topics relevant to business owners, buyers, and sellers. For example, they feature articles that focus on how to make a business more interesting to a potential buyer. These resources help to position BizBuySell as a go-to place for a range of relevant business information.

Of course, every quarter BizBuySell publishes Insight Reports complete with interactive market data. These reports offer a comprehensive overview of trends that are essential for brokerage professionals to know about. The latest report can be accessed here. It covers important trends noted in the first quarter of the year. 

Some of the changes that were noted in this important report include the following:

1. Rebounding Transactions

For Q1 2022, the Quarterly Report indicates that transactions are continuing to rebound from the slump of Q2 2020. Year over year, transactions shot up a whopping 24% and are now beginning to return to 2019 levels. 

Overall, the main sector that seems to be holding back an even stronger rebound is the restaurant sector, which is still not where it was in pre-pandemic years. However, with that stated, the restaurant sector has also dramatically improved and has shot up by 42% year over year. Yet, the restaurant sector is still down 22% from Q1 2019.

2. Changing Buyer Preferences 

When BizBuySell surveyed buyers as to what kind of business they wanted to buy, the numbers were eye opening. 35% of surveyed buyers responded that they were interested in the service sector, and this was followed by 15% of respondents choosing retail. Director of Sales Doug Whitmire stated, “Buyer demand seems to be leaning toward business services, self-storage, car washes, as well as advanced distribution services for manufacturers. There have been few opportunities, so buyers are flocking to them and inventory is limited.” The result of the limited inventory is record sales prices.

3. Listing Growth

In Q1 2022 listing growth has increased substantially, with service listings up 14%. While the restaurant sector is obviously still lagging, it is important to note that the Quarterly Report indicated that restaurants were experiencing a 10% growth. If the pandemic continues to recede, we could see a robust rebound in the restaurant sector.

4. A Boom in Sellers

The Q1 report also indicates that sellers, who have previously been sitting on the sidelines, are deciding that now is the time to sell. Once again there is talk of a “silver tsunami” approaching as Baby Boomers begin to sell. It is also interesting to note that many of those who are selling are doing so due to burnout. Importantly, burnout is occurring for a variety of diverse reasons, ranging from supply chain and labor issues to pandemic burnout.

Advice for Sellers

The BizBuySell team strongly advises that sellers should fix major supply chain issues before entering the market. Whitmire noted, “We try to get our clients to work with us to fix those issues before we go to market. Many times, you only have one chance with a buyer and then you lose them.” It definitely makes sense for sellers to try their best to remedy any issues that might have resulted from Covid-related circumstances. This will ensure that the sales process goes as smoothly as possible. 

Copyright: Business Brokerage Press, Inc.

plyaphunjun/BigStock.com

The post 4 Takeaways from the Latest BizBuySell Quarterly Report appeared first on Deal Studio – Automate, accelerate and elevate your deal making.

The True Meaning of a Fairness Opinion

Many people assume they know what “fairness opinion” means because they are familiar with the term “fair market value.” Fair market value refers to a price that is reasonable for both a buyer and seller in an open and competitive market. However, a fairness opinion is quite different. This term refers to a report that evaluates the facts of a merger or acquisition or any other type of business purchase. 

A fairness opinion is typically in the form of a letter that contains an actual opinion and justification of why a selling price is fair. Of course, there are limitations, as this report is fully based on information that has been provided by the management of the business. 

Who Prepares a Fairness Opinion?

A fairness opinion must be prepared by a professional with expertise in business valuation. It is typically done by a business intermediary or appraiser. An investment banker can also prepare a fairness opinion. Although the professional who prepares the fairness opinion may very well have experience in structuring deals, this letter does not include any information or opinion on the deal itself. It also doesn’t include advice or recommendation. In preparing the report, the advisor seeks to look at the deal from the perspective of the investors. 

Basically, it is structured to specifically comment on fairness from a financial perspective, based on the information on hand.

Who Uses Fairness Opinions?

You will most frequently see fairness opinions utilized in the sale of public companies by the board of directors. When this document is received, it shows that the board is working to protect the shareholders. Of course, fairness opinions can also be used for private companies. In this case, it can serve to protect the interest of shareholders or family members who may later look to challenge the sales price. However, in most situations that involve middle market private acquisitions, a fairness opinion is not necessary. 

In the end, a fairness opinion assists with communication and decision-making. It serves to lower the risks surrounding a deal. This important document can be used in court if a shareholder later decides to file a lawsuit against the director of a company.

Copyright: Business Brokerage Press, Inc.

Lichtmeister/BigStock.com

The post The True Meaning of a Fairness Opinion appeared first on Deal Studio – Automate, accelerate and elevate your deal making.

Telling the Story of Your Business

Often selling a business comes down to storytelling. The buyer and seller are the main characters of the story that is being told. The seller is the one relaying the story, and the ideal buyer is the one who truly sees the future opportunity. 

A Brokerage Professional Can Help Tell Your Story

The simple fact of the matter is that often even sellers don’t know what the true story of their business actually is. They tend to lack the proper perspective as they are too deeply involved. Sellers may be burnt out or have never really thought through the story of their business in the first place. 

Business brokers and M&A advisors serve a great function as a third party who can look at the story from a different perspective. These professionals are numbers people, but it goes beyond that, as they can clearly see your business as a story to be told. And they can help you control that storyline for optimal results. 

Embracing the Human Element

In order to tell the story of the business and why a buyer should want to buy it, it is necessary for your business broker or M&A advisor to truly understand your business. This is why good communication is so important. After the interview process, these professionals must precisely arrange all the relevant information in such a way that the buyer can digest it and see the potential within the business. Through that means, a prospective buyer can understand that value and envision him or herself as the hero.

It Goes Beyond the Financials

Business brokers and M&A advisors also help sellers determine the price and work as advisors on pricing. The story of the business does start with the financials and the facts. But this is only the beginning of the process. Brokerage professionals will want to interview you to learn how to weave together your story. 

In the end, every story has a moral. It is important to pull all of these elements together to make an engaging story that will ultimately inspire and motivate a buyer to buy the business.

Storytelling Leads to Successful Deals 

When buyers open their minds to the story being told, they are able to envision the future potential of the business and why it is going to be a valuable opportunity.  At the end of the day, selling a business isn’t strictly about numbers, figures, facts, profit and loss margins, and other financial variables. Instead, it is also about the people. 

Copyright: Business Brokerage Press, Inc.

fizkes/BigStock.com

The post Telling the Story of Your Business appeared first on Deal Studio – Automate, accelerate and elevate your deal making.

How Sellers Can Boost Their Levels of Success

Many buyers view a publicly-held company as virtually being an open book with at least a modest level of transparency, whereas privately-held companies reveal much less about their inner workings, financial, and otherwise. Of course, this means that buyers of privately-held companies are left with no choice but to dig through whatever information is available in an effort to determine if a valuation or price indeed reflects reality.

Comparing Publicly and Privately Held Companies

Determining the price on a privately-held company is typically more time-consuming since privately-held companies don’t have to deal with audited financial statements. But why do most privately-held companies typically forgo the process? Audited financial statements are expensive, and it is this expense that often prevents companies from going public. A publicly-held company is expected to reveal significantly more information, including often sensitive financial information.

What Sellers Can Do

If you’re a seller, you can take steps to make the process a bit easier for buyers. One step is to work closely with your accountant in an effort to ensure that the numbers are not just accurate, but are also presented in a concise and easy to understand fashion. This move serves to boost trust between buyers and sellers and, in turn, can increase the chances of selling your business. 

Determining value is another area where sellers of privately-held companies can take steps to assist buyers in determining price or value. Sellers should consider opting for an outside appraiser or expert when it comes to determining the value of their business. The opinion of an outside expert clearly carries more weight, and using an outside expert is yet another step that sellers can take to boost overall trust with buyers. 

Establish Your Bottom Line

Another key step is for sellers to establish their wish price. The wish price can be thought of as what price the seller would ultimately like to receive. It is also helpful for sellers to know well in advance what their lowest possible price for their business would be. 

When establishing a price, there are several areas of the business where sellers can expect buyers to pay special attention. Here are a few areas that buyers are likely to explore: 

  • Size and scope of customer base 
  • Needs for capital expenditures 
  • Overall stability of the market 
  • Stability of earnings 
  • The general landscape of competitors 
  • Businesses relationships with suppliers 

As with all transactions, the marketplace will have the final word regarding the sale of any business. Sellers should expect to receive a price somewhere between their asking price and their lowest price. But taking the right steps throughout the process can definitely make the process go more smoothly and boost the chances of success.

Copyright: Business Brokerage Press, Inc.

insta_photos/BigStock.com

The post How Sellers Can Boost Their Levels of Success appeared first on Deal Studio – Automate, accelerate and elevate your deal making.

Not All Buyers Are Created Equal: The Mindset of the Serious Buyer

Just as every person is different, the same invariably holds true for buyers. No two buyers are the same. Further, no two buyers have the same mindset, emotional makeup, or approach to business. The simple fact is that buyers opt to buy businesses for a very wide range of reasons. The bottom line is that it is up to business brokers and M&A advisors to find serious buyers so as not to waste everyone’s time. In this article, we will examine how we zero in on serious buyers.

A serious buyer, one that wants to achieve success and isn’t just window shopping, will want to understand both the business they are considering buying and the industry as a whole. Consider this rough analogy for a moment. Someone serious about winning a game will work to understand the rules before jumping in and playing. You’ll want to look for a buyer who wants to understand the strengths and weaknesses of a business. He or she will also want to comprehend the strengths and weaknesses of competitors as well as potential industry wide problems both now and in the future.

Savvy business people realize that wages and salaries make up a huge percentage of the typical business’s operating cost. A serious buyer will endeavor to understand not just the wages and salaries of employees, but also additional related costs. These can include retirement related costs, the cost of training new employees, the rate of employee turnover and more. Smart buyers are looking for stability throughout the business, and that includes its employees.

The kind of buyers you want to attract are the ones that are not just “thinking about buying” a business. You’ll want to only deal with buyers who have carefully thought through what it means to buy a business. A key aspect of buying a business, as simple as it sounds, is to fully understand what is being sold. For example, serious buyers will dive in and understand capital expenditures. They will also examine and evaluate machinery and equipment so that they understand what kinds of equipment might need to be repaired or replaced. Replacing and repairing equipment can mean substantial costs. That’s why quality buyers can be expected to evaluate all equipment extremely carefully.

Buyers who understand what it means to buy a business will even go beyond evaluating the stability of employees and the state of machinery and equipment. You can expect a serious buyer to want to know if there are any environmental concerns, they will check and evaluate the lease, and they will want to inspect the state of all buildings. They will want to know who the key clients and key suppliers are and determine if those relationships are stable or if they put the business at long term risk.

At the end of the day, the kind of buyer that you’ll want to work with is a buyer who is proactive. Quality buyers will be accessing every aspect of a business to determine its long-term viability. A buyer who goes far beyond “kicking the tires” is exactly the kind of buyer you want.

Copyright: Business Brokerage Press, Inc.

vichie81/BigStock.com

The post Not All Buyers Are Created Equal: The Mindset of the Serious Buyer appeared first on Deal Studio – Automate, accelerate and elevate your deal making.

Important Factors to Consider in Your Lease

Owning and operating a business can be rather demanding and that means from time-to-time details can slip through the cracks. All too often, businessowners don’t fully comprehend their leases and this can lead to a variety of problems. For example, if your business location is a key part of your success, it is incredibly important that you are well aware of all the essential points in your lease. Many businesses, ranging from restaurants and service businesses to retail stores, can be very location sensitive. 

Don’t Let Key Details Slip by You

Regardless what kind of business you own, it is vital that you understand every aspect of your lease. You may even have to get an attorney involved to help you understand the implications of the minor points. A failure to do so could translate to the failure of your business.

The Length of Your Lease

The length of your lease tops our list of lease related factors you need to understand. While there are many variables that will affect you, in general, the longer your lease the better. It should come as no surprise that a longer lease gives your business an increased level of stability.

Exit and Exclusivity Clauses

If you are negotiating a lease, it is prudent to include an option for getting out of the lease. Just as having a longer lease provides you with greater flexibility, the same holds true for being able to exit your lease if the need arises.

A lease is not a one-dimensional document, just as your location is not one-dimensional either. The location in which your business is located matters. If you are signing a lease to locate your business in a strip mall or shopping mall, you should try to have written into your lease agreement that you are the only business of your type that will be located in the mall. After all, the last thing you want is to see a similar business opening up nearby.

Transferring Your Lease 

Negotiating a long lease and having a way out of your lease are critically important, but so is being able to transfer your lease. At some point in the future, you may need to sell your business. For this reason, it is in your interest to have a clear understanding of how, and under what circumstances, you can transfer your lease to a new owner.

It is important to discuss the possibility of selling your business with the landlord before going to market to understand if the lease will be able to convey.  While the landlord cannot restrict the sale of your business, you could get left holding a personal guarantee in order for the lease to remain in place for the remainder of the existing lease term.  Then the new owner would be left to negotiate the lease renewal on their own.

Assignment of Responsibilities 

Rounding out our list of key factors to consider for your lease are what you are responsible for and what the landlord is responsible for handling. If you as the business owner are to shoulder responsibilities related to the property, then those responsibilities should also be clearly outlined in the lease.

There is no doubt there are many variables involved in owning and operating any business. The physical location of your business should be among your top concerns. You should do everything possible to understand your lease. When signing a new lease, try to negotiate a lease that will be as helpful to you as possible. 

Copyright: Business Brokerage Press, Inc.

Kmpzzz/BigStock.com

The post Important Factors to Consider in Your Lease appeared first on Deal Studio – Automate, accelerate and elevate your deal making.